Daily Cooking Quest

easy Indonesian recipes

Gulai Daun Singkong - Cassava Leaves Stew

Whenever I visit a Padang restaurant, it is almost a certainty that I will grab this among the many plates to choose from. If you have trouble finding cassava leaves, you can actually substitute with equal amount of spinach, but the cooking time has to be reduced significantly to 5 minutes in step 3 instead of 15 minutes. ♥

Gulai Daun Singkong - Cassava Leaves Stew

Gulai Daun Singkong - Cassava Leaves Stew

Gulai Daun Singkong - Cassava Leaves Stew


5.0 from 1 reviews

Categories:

Cuisine:

Prep Time: 15 mins

Cook Time: 30 mins

Total Time: 45 mins

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 2 bunch of cassava leaves (about 250 gram), washed and drained
  • 2 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 5 bay leaves (Indonesian: daun salam)
  • 1 lemongrass (Indonesian: sereh), chopped into 4 pieces
  • 750 ml water
  • 250 ml thick coconut milk
  • Grind the following into spice paste
  • 5 red chilies (Indonesian: cabe merah keriting)
  • 8 shallots (Indonesian: bawang merah)
  • 2 cloves garlic (Indonesian: bawang putih)
  • 3 candlenuts (Indonesian: kemiri)
  • 2 fresh turmeric (Indonesian: kunyit), each about 1 inch length
  • 1 inch fresh ginger (Indonesian: jahe)
  • 1 inch fresh galangal (Indonesian: lengkuas)
  • 1/2 tablespoon ground coriander (Indonesian: bubuk ketumbar)
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar

Instructions

  1. Heat cooking oil in a deep skillet (or a pot) and fry the spice paste until fragrant, about 3-5 minutes.
  2. Add bay leaves and lemongrass and cook for another 2 minutes.
  3. Toss in the cassava leaves and pour water into the skillet. Cook until boiling. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Add coconut milk, mix well, and simmer for another 5 minutes. Adjust salt and sugar as needed.
  5. (Optional) With a scissor, cut the cassava leaves into smaller pieces so they are easier to scoop with a spoon when consumed.
  6. Turn off heat and serve hot or at room temperature with steamed white rice.

Comments

  • Mark Burke says:

    Hi Anita, First: I really love your website! It is the best source for Indonesian cooking I've found on the internet, and the photos are all very beautiful! I had a question about this recipe in particular. If candlenuts are not available, what is a good substitute? Thanks for such a lovely site!

    • Anita says:

      Hi Mark, thank you for your kind words :) The best substitute for candlenut is macadamia nut, which is much easier to find outside of Indonesia.

  • Yudhi says:

    Hi Anita, ini resep pertama yng saya masak. Rasanya enak sekali.

    • Anita says:

      Wah, thank you Yudhi :)

  • Yudhi says:

    Tapi saya tidak bisa mendapatkan daun singkong disini. Jadi saya ganti pakai KALE dan pakai ikan teri nasi. Saya senang dan suka dng resep-resep yng anda posting. Karena saya besar di Jakarta. Thanks for great and delicious recipe.

  • Peter Ng says:

    Probably need to pre treat the leaves by boiling in salted water. Can try adding anchovies and petai.

    • Anita says:

      Good idea Peter :)

      • Peter Ng says:

        Good recipe , thank you for sharing

  • Ben says:

    Hi Anita, Just found your website and love the recipes I've tried so far. I used to live Sumatra and missed eating all these wonderful dishes! Several questions about purchasing: How do find thin coconut milk? I know some people just water down the canned coconut milk but it seems like everyone has a different ratio. Where have you been able to find Cassava leaf? I look at several major Asian grocery stores in the DC area and no one had it When you use shallots are they just the normal 2inch shallots sold in every grocery store? I guess i never realized how many shallots it takes to make an indonesian feast!

    • Anita says:

      Hi Ben, glad you love my recipes and they remind you of the good food you had in Sumatra :) If a recipe says thick coconut milk, I usually use canned coconut cream (e.g. this one), and when it just says coconut milk, any regular canned coconut milk will do. If you think the regular canned coconut milk is too thick, you can definitely try water it down. Yeah, ratio can be hard to pin down since most of Indonesian recipes that has them, we can always control the amount of sauce by simply cooking it for a shorter/longer period of time. :D But, if you must water it down, try with 1 part coconut milk to 1/2 part water first. I think it is safer not to water it down too much since we can add more water if need be, but the reverse might not be that easy, especially if no more coconut milk supply is at hand! Cassava leaf is really hard to find here. In fact, when I wrote this recipe I was still back in Jakarta. I have tried to replicate this recipe using kale with great success though, and kale is super easy to find :) Just use the exact same amount of leaf. You are absolutely right that Indonesian shallot is smaller in size compared to the ones sold here in US. When I don't give out specific weight, you can safely assume 1 regular US shallot = 3 Indonesian sized smaller shallots. Hope this helps :)

      • Ben says:

        Thank you so much! I should have checked back sooner, but for some reason it didn't send an email when you replied! One more question, when you're measuring out the ginger, galangal, and turmeric. the pieces at my local asian market vary wildly in thickness. Is it pretty much just equal portions of all three? And then following up on your coconut milk answer, so i should just use the cream for this recipe and then regular canned coconut milk for things like the jackfruit curry recipe that call for "thin coconut milk (Indonesian: santan)"?

        • Anita says:

          Hi Ben, turmeric is generally much thinner compare to ginger or galangal, so I would use the same amount of ginger and galangal, but only half for turmeric (assuming you are going by weight). For this particular recipe, if you are using regular canned coconut milk, start with 1 can milk + 1 can water should be pretty safe.

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