Daily Cooking Quest

easy Indonesian recipes

Sapi Tumis Leunca - Beef and Green Nightshade Stir Fry

The two most common and popular recipes using leunca (green nightshade) are definitely lalapan and sambal leunca. Not that there is anything wrong in using leunca only for those recipes, but if you are willing to experiment, give this easy stir fry recipe a try and you might be hooked.

Sapi Tumis Leunca - Beef and Green Nightshade Stir Fry

Sapi Tumis Leunca - Beef and Green Nightshade Stir Fry

The photo above shows the ingredients use in the recipe, minus the beef. I use thinly sliced beef when making this, but I am quite certain other proteins can be used too, like thinly sliced chicken, or even tofu to make a completely vegetarian version of this dish.

Sapi Tumis Leunca - Beef and Green Nightshade Stir Fry

Sapi Tumis Leunca - Beef and Green Nightshade Stir Fry

Sapi Tumis Leunca - Beef and Green Nightshade Stir Fry

Categories:

Cuisine:

Prep Time: 15 mins

Cook Time: 15 mins

Total Time: 30 mins

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoon oil
  • 6 shallots (Indonesian: bawang merah), thinly sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic (Indonesian: bawang putih), thinly sliced
  • 4 red anaheim chili peppers (Indonesian: cabe besar merah), seeded and sliced diagonally
  • 3 kaffir lime leaves (Indonesian: daun jeruk)
  • 1 lemongrass (Indonesian: sereh), bruised and knotted
  • 500 gram beef (Indonesian: daging sapi), thinly sliced
  • 100 gram green nightshade (Indonesian: leunca)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon sweet soy sauce (Indonesian: kecap manis)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in a frying pan and sauté shallot, garlic, chili, lime leaves, and lemongrass until fragrant.
  2. Add beef into the pan and cook until no longer pink.
  3. Add green nightshade, water, sweet soy sauce, salt, and sugar. Mix well and bring to a boil. Cook until the beef is tender and the sauce is slightly reduced.
  4. Turn off heat, transfer to a serving plate and serve immediately with steamed white rice.

Comments

  • Marie says:

    I'd love to know your source your green nightshade (unripe Solanum nigrum). Most literature refers to the solanine in the green berries as dangerously toxic, but obviously so many Indonesians can't be wrong about eating it.

    • Anita says:

      Hi Marie, I made this when I was still living in Indonesia. The berries is very commonly sold in supermarkets and wet markets, in Jakarta at least. I haven't seen this sold in the United States, so I cannot tell you where to source it. I have read that people forage for this? And it sounds like the ones grow here in the States can be toxic just like you said, so make extra sure to find out if you can safely consume it or not.

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